How to Write: Haiku

Small but packs a punch Not spicy, might make you cry From the Japanese. That’s not me talking like a caveman, that’s a Haiku about Haikus! Haiku’s are traditional Japanese poems that say a lot in just 17 syllables. The 17 syllables are divided into three lines: five syllables in the first line, seven in…

How to Write: Concrete Poem

One of the more underrated forms of poetry, concrete poems, are also known as shape poems. Here’s an example of a concrete poem (you’ll see for yourself why it’s called that!. To be clear, concrete poems are shaped in a meaningful way; the words of the poem are placed in order to form some kind…

How to Write: Fan Fiction

Are there characters from a book series that you can’t wait to read more about? Do you love the characters from your favourite TV show so much that you wish you could join them on their adventures? Well, stop waiting for the next sequel or the next episode, and write your own! All around you,…

How to Write: Book Review

Are your friends always asking you for a book recommendation? Do you find yourself bumping into walls all of the time because you simply cannot take your nose out of a great book? Try writing a book review! Lots of people seek out book reviews when they are deciding what to read—that way, they don’t…

Writer’s Block: Go to the Movies!

Let’s say you have an idea for a story, but you still can’t seem to put pen to paper. Try going to the movies! No, not actually leaving your house and catching the latest blockbuster (although you can do that too, “for inspiration.”) Note if you don’t have an idea for a story yet, don’t…

How to Write: Song Lyrics

I’ve never thought about song writing as a weapon. I’ve only thought about it as a way to help me get through love and loss and sadness and loneliness and growing up. — Taylor Swift So you listen to music all day, every day and you want to try your hand at writing a song…

How to Write: Literary Journalism

Literary journalism. The term itself sounds a bit paradoxical, doesn’t it? Journalism is concerned with factual details. Literariness deals with the beauty of prose. But, literary journalism combines the two: the writer investigates some person or place and reports on it, using the power of words to make the tale even more compelling. If you’d…